Thursday, 6 June 2019

Ancient Texts

Well, well, I have just been reminded that the 1st edition of Mineral Processing Technology was published 40 years ago this month! I wonder if anyone still has a copy of the 'little red book' (or should that be little-read book?).
Ten years further down the line, Fathi Habashi, Emeritus Professor at Laval University, who will be 91 years old in October, tells me that the first volume of his Principles of Extractive Metallurgy, entitled General Principles, was published 50 years ago. This was followed in 1970 by the second volume entitled Hydrometallurgy, then in 1986 the third volume Pyrometallurgy.
I wonder just how relevant these first editions are today!
Twitter @barrywills

14 comments:

  1. Thanks for reminding our generation mineral engineers about those classic books--I just glanced through; they are very relevant because they explain, in simple language, the principles with examples.
    Books by Taggart.Gaudin, Barry Wills,Dr.Lynch--may count on fingers ,are treasures. I hope the present generation students read them to get a complete knowledge of all aspects of our profession.

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  2. I've still got my copy of the red book - Barry's first edition, but unsigned! Still an excellent introduction to the subject, and I referred to it quite recently to brush up on a couple of unfamiliar processes. A useful book for the shelf or work bag.

    I never used the other book, but I think the cover image is from Agricola, De Re Metallica. That is an interesting book, less practical use today but fascinating to see how advanced the industry was 5-600 years ago, and all powered by water and wind, which is quite topical!

    Sam Wood, Buxton, UK

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    1. Thanks Sam. Bring the book to one of the sundowners and I will sign it- I still have my old quill pen

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  3. ultimately the numbers and the methodologies are the same, and probably the equipment is mostly the same, but as with time ideas change and as do processes. Target is still as relevant today as it was then?

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  4. Fundamental! Are always my first source
    Rui Sousa, Sojitz Beralt Tin and Wolfram, Portugal

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  5. Totally relevant now and into the future. As long as there's mineral processing. Certainly beyond my lifetime!
    Bill Skinner, University of South Australia

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  6. These two great books, have made a lot of money in mining sector! Many engineers have become rich after learning the details of basic process engineering from these two superior books!
    I believe those are foundations in Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy.
    Abbas Tabatabaei, Operation Metallurgist/Superintendent

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  7. Very relevant, basic edition is backbone for the updated editions, thanks all the authors for such books
    Dr. Mahesh Kulkarni
    Assistant General Manager - R&D at ASHAPURA MINECHEM LTD, India

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  8. Sadly, many participants in mineral processing operations and metallurgical operations are unaware of the fundamentals presented in these books.
    Kudos to the authors for their creating these works and in Barry’s case, for frequently updating the text.
    Robert Seitz, Phoenix, Arizona

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  9. Very relevant: always will be a reference for students and professors (learning and teaching), engineers and professionals (ore body development and treatment). Mining industry remains conservative, but the positive part is this high consideration for the ancient texts.
    Daniel Amariei, COREM, Canada

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  10. Mineral Processing Technology, First Edition is a great book, It is ancient but I love and use all the time. Congratulations, Barry. You have done a great job of educating Mineral Processors.
    S Komar Kawatra, Professor, Chemical engineering, Michigan Technological University, USA

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  11. Thanks to all of you for your kind comments

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  12. Min Pro Tech textbook was the recommended textbook used in my 4 years in uni to complete my Min Pro Eng. degree and still is the recommended textbook today in Uni. for this degree program. The ancient texts still lives on.
    Mark Ala'u, Consultant, Papua New Guinea

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  13. Mineral Processing Technology was my favourite book at University - never thought of it as a ancient text. I guess I am showing my age!
    Alan Fischer, Fischerchem Flotation Chemicals, Singapore

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