Sunday, 21 February 2010

19th Century tin mining around Perranporth

Barbara and I walked the magnificent Penhale Sands this afternoon, at Perranporth, less than 20 miles from Falmouth, on Cornwall’s rugged north coast.

Perranporth’s history is a mixture of mining and its association with the patron saint of Cornwall, St Piran. The author Winston Graham lived in Perranporth for many years and his famous Poldark novels, which were televised, are based on the history of the area and its local families. "Hendrawna Sands" in the novels is Perranporth beach.

The splendid beach of golden sand is 3 miles in length but for minerals people it is the cliffs that are of great interest. Evidence of the intense 19th Century coastal tin mining activity begins at Perranporth, and stretches westwards to Land’s End.

The cliffs are full of the relics of the mining which took place here. Look out for the many holes cut into the rock, which are known in Cornwall as adits, and were created by hand to drain the many nearby tin-mines.


More Cornish Walks
More on Cornish Mining
More on Cornwall

2 comments:

  1. By email:

    I have just discovered the most interesting photos you took at Perranporth, of the old tin mine workings, so I wonder if I may keep a copy for my records.

    I should explain that in 1954 aged 14, I spent a wonderful two weeks exploring all those workings open to the beach, so that from then on I have become a mining [Cornish} history nut, on arriving in South Australia in 1961, I spent much time at exploring much of this states mining history, spent 20 years as Project Officer for the Moonta National Trust, building mining displays & models plus small 31/2 mile railway, now researching the history of Whims,Whips,&Windlass's in SA, plus the Cornish Mining Captains in SA, have been the unpaid mine model maker for all SA mining museums. So you see why I wish to keep a copy of your photos to show my family where I got the history bug from-Big Grin.
    My webb page may be of interest- www.miningmodels.netfirms.com
    Thanks for reading this.
    Take Care.
    Roger B Bradford.
    Australia

    ReplyDelete
  2. That is Wheal Vlow adit in the second picture. Tin and Zinc.

    ReplyDelete

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